Contractor to help with filters

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Contractor to help with filters

Oliver Dain
Hi ffmpeg-users,

My company, revl.com, has several videos that could be improved. We've
played around with ffmpeg filters and haven't had much success. We're
hoping to find a contractor who can help. This would be a paid contract
probably lasting about a week.

Specifically we have 4 types of issues:

1. Sections of video that are too dark due to back-lighting
2. Sections of video that are too dark due to general low-light levels
3. Bits of video that are shaky
4. Videos that generally look OK but could look even better with different
saturation or contrast settings.

Ffmpeg provides a lot of filters and each filter can take a variety of
configuration options. What we're hoping to find is a set of filter
configurations (e.g. a string passed --filter-complex) that will improve
our footage. These filters need to be configured to automatically detect
frames that exhibit the issue; applying a filter at specific manually
determined time points is not sufficient. It is OK to tell ffmpeg which
parts of the video frame to use for determining proper light levels however.

If you're interested please reply directly to me and we can setup a quick
video chat to discuss the project in detail.

Thanks,
Oliver Dain
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Re: Contractor to help with filters

Michael Shaffer
Issues 1 and 2 would be pretty simple to fix. I would use Adobe Photoshop
create a "curves" layer which can then be exported as a .crv file. The .crv
file can be loaded by ffmpeg and applied to the image. Adobe Photoshop has
an auto-adjust button which gets it close, then you can tweak the
individual RGB values. That is how I eliminate atmospheric haze in real
time on my live cam. Here's a view of how it looks:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ixjB6dKsgk

I'm not sure about how you would auto detect changes in the
brightness/contrast. I know OpenCV can do that by calculating a histogram
of the entire image. I'm not sure if ffmpeg can do that or not since I've
never needed to do that.

Michael



On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 4:52 PM Oliver Dain <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi ffmpeg-users,
>
> My company, revl.com, has several videos that could be improved. We've
> played around with ffmpeg filters and haven't had much success. We're
> hoping to find a contractor who can help. This would be a paid contract
> probably lasting about a week.
>
> Specifically we have 4 types of issues:
>
> 1. Sections of video that are too dark due to back-lighting
> 2. Sections of video that are too dark due to general low-light levels
> 3. Bits of video that are shaky
> 4. Videos that generally look OK but could look even better with different
> saturation or contrast settings.
>
> Ffmpeg provides a lot of filters and each filter can take a variety of
> configuration options. What we're hoping to find is a set of filter
> configurations (e.g. a string passed --filter-complex) that will improve
> our footage. These filters need to be configured to automatically detect
> frames that exhibit the issue; applying a filter at specific manually
> determined time points is not sufficient. It is OK to tell ffmpeg which
> parts of the video frame to use for determining proper light levels
> however.
>
> If you're interested please reply directly to me and we can setup a quick
> video chat to discuss the project in detail.
>
> Thanks,
> Oliver Dain
> _______________________________________________
> ffmpeg-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>
> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user

To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
[hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
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Re: Contractor to help with filters

Oliver Dain
Hi Michael,

Thanks for the suggestion. I'm not sure what your suggesting would work for
us. Lets say we have a video that's 5 minutes long and there's a 5 second
segment somewhere in the middle that needs its levels adjusted. If we used
your solution we'd adjust the entire video so the 5 seconds that was bad
would now look good but the rest of the video would look worse. We're
producing hundreds and hundreds of videos per day and the segments that
need adjusting are different for each video so manually finding the time
offsets where curves should be applied isn't possible (to say nothing of
finding the appropriate curve for each video).

What we need is a solution that analyzes the video to detect when frames
are dark and then lightens only those frames. What I think we need is
something like the "pp=autolevels" filter but I haven't had much luck with
that.

Thanks,
Oliver

On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 3:24 PM Michael Shaffer <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> Issues 1 and 2 would be pretty simple to fix. I would use Adobe Photoshop
> create a "curves" layer which can then be exported as a .crv file. The .crv
> file can be loaded by ffmpeg and applied to the image. Adobe Photoshop has
> an auto-adjust button which gets it close, then you can tweak the
> individual RGB values. That is how I eliminate atmospheric haze in real
> time on my live cam. Here's a view of how it looks:
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ixjB6dKsgk
>
> I'm not sure about how you would auto detect changes in the
> brightness/contrast. I know OpenCV can do that by calculating a histogram
> of the entire image. I'm not sure if ffmpeg can do that or not since I've
> never needed to do that.
>
> Michael
>
>
>
> On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 4:52 PM Oliver Dain <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > Hi ffmpeg-users,
> >
> > My company, revl.com, has several videos that could be improved. We've
> > played around with ffmpeg filters and haven't had much success. We're
> > hoping to find a contractor who can help. This would be a paid contract
> > probably lasting about a week.
> >
> > Specifically we have 4 types of issues:
> >
> > 1. Sections of video that are too dark due to back-lighting
> > 2. Sections of video that are too dark due to general low-light levels
> > 3. Bits of video that are shaky
> > 4. Videos that generally look OK but could look even better with
> different
> > saturation or contrast settings.
> >
> > Ffmpeg provides a lot of filters and each filter can take a variety of
> > configuration options. What we're hoping to find is a set of filter
> > configurations (e.g. a string passed --filter-complex) that will improve
> > our footage. These filters need to be configured to automatically detect
> > frames that exhibit the issue; applying a filter at specific manually
> > determined time points is not sufficient. It is OK to tell ffmpeg which
> > parts of the video frame to use for determining proper light levels
> > however.
> >
> > If you're interested please reply directly to me and we can setup a quick
> > video chat to discuss the project in detail.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Oliver Dain
> > _______________________________________________
> > ffmpeg-user mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
> >
> > To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
> > [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
> _______________________________________________
> ffmpeg-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>
> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user

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Re: Contractor to help with filters

Mick Finn
You need some rule based / AI processing to determine ‘bad lighting sections’ - if you achieve would be viable commercial product.
Does ffmpeg have histogram and histogram equalization features?
Blindly doing histogram equalization on entire sequence might actually work depending on content.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 31, 2019, at 6:58 AM, Oliver Dain <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Hi Michael,
>
> Thanks for the suggestion. I'm not sure what your suggesting would work for
> us. Lets say we have a video that's 5 minutes long and there's a 5 second
> segment somewhere in the middle that needs its levels adjusted. If we used
> your solution we'd adjust the entire video so the 5 seconds that was bad
> would now look good but the rest of the video would look worse. We're
> producing hundreds and hundreds of videos per day and the segments that
> need adjusting are different for each video so manually finding the time
> offsets where curves should be applied isn't possible (to say nothing of
> finding the appropriate curve for each video).
>
> What we need is a solution that analyzes the video to detect when frames
> are dark and then lightens only those frames. What I think we need is
> something like the "pp=autolevels" filter but I haven't had much luck with
> that.
>
> Thanks,
> Oliver
>
> On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 3:24 PM Michael Shaffer <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
>> Issues 1 and 2 would be pretty simple to fix. I would use Adobe Photoshop
>> create a "curves" layer which can then be exported as a .crv file. The .crv
>> file can be loaded by ffmpeg and applied to the image. Adobe Photoshop has
>> an auto-adjust button which gets it close, then you can tweak the
>> individual RGB values. That is how I eliminate atmospheric haze in real
>> time on my live cam. Here's a view of how it looks:
>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ixjB6dKsgk
>>
>> I'm not sure about how you would auto detect changes in the
>> brightness/contrast. I know OpenCV can do that by calculating a histogram
>> of the entire image. I'm not sure if ffmpeg can do that or not since I've
>> never needed to do that.
>>
>> Michael
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 4:52 PM Oliver Dain <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi ffmpeg-users,
>>>
>>> My company, revl.com, has several videos that could be improved. We've
>>> played around with ffmpeg filters and haven't had much success. We're
>>> hoping to find a contractor who can help. This would be a paid contract
>>> probably lasting about a week.
>>>
>>> Specifically we have 4 types of issues:
>>>
>>> 1. Sections of video that are too dark due to back-lighting
>>> 2. Sections of video that are too dark due to general low-light levels
>>> 3. Bits of video that are shaky
>>> 4. Videos that generally look OK but could look even better with
>> different
>>> saturation or contrast settings.
>>>
>>> Ffmpeg provides a lot of filters and each filter can take a variety of
>>> configuration options. What we're hoping to find is a set of filter
>>> configurations (e.g. a string passed --filter-complex) that will improve
>>> our footage. These filters need to be configured to automatically detect
>>> frames that exhibit the issue; applying a filter at specific manually
>>> determined time points is not sufficient. It is OK to tell ffmpeg which
>>> parts of the video frame to use for determining proper light levels
>>> however.
>>>
>>> If you're interested please reply directly to me and we can setup a quick
>>> video chat to discuss the project in detail.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Oliver Dain
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> ffmpeg-user mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
>>> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
>> _______________________________________________
>> ffmpeg-user mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>>
>> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
>> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
> _______________________________________________
> ffmpeg-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>
> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
_______________________________________________
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https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user

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Re: Contractor to help with filters

Mark Filipak
Is your application real-time?

On 12/30/2019 10:32 PM, Mick Finn wrote:

> You need some rule based / AI processing to determine ‘bad lighting sections’ - if you achieve would be viable commercial product.
> Does ffmpeg have histogram and histogram equalization features?
> Blindly doing histogram equalization on entire sequence might actually work depending on content.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Dec 31, 2019, at 6:58 AM, Oliver Dain <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> Hi Michael,
>>
>> Thanks for the suggestion. I'm not sure what your suggesting would work for
>> us. Lets say we have a video that's 5 minutes long and there's a 5 second
>> segment somewhere in the middle that needs its levels adjusted. If we used
>> your solution we'd adjust the entire video so the 5 seconds that was bad
>> would now look good but the rest of the video would look worse. We're
>> producing hundreds and hundreds of videos per day and the segments that
>> need adjusting are different for each video so manually finding the time
>> offsets where curves should be applied isn't possible (to say nothing of
>> finding the appropriate curve for each video).
>>
>> What we need is a solution that analyzes the video to detect when frames
>> are dark and then lightens only those frames. What I think we need is
>> something like the "pp=autolevels" filter but I haven't had much luck with
>> that.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Oliver
>>
>> On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 3:24 PM Michael Shaffer <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Issues 1 and 2 would be pretty simple to fix. I would use Adobe Photoshop
>>> create a "curves" layer which can then be exported as a .crv file. The .crv
>>> file can be loaded by ffmpeg and applied to the image. Adobe Photoshop has
>>> an auto-adjust button which gets it close, then you can tweak the
>>> individual RGB values. That is how I eliminate atmospheric haze in real
>>> time on my live cam. Here's a view of how it looks:
>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ixjB6dKsgk
>>>
>>> I'm not sure about how you would auto detect changes in the
>>> brightness/contrast. I know OpenCV can do that by calculating a histogram
>>> of the entire image. I'm not sure if ffmpeg can do that or not since I've
>>> never needed to do that.
>>>
>>> Michael
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 4:52 PM Oliver Dain <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi ffmpeg-users,
>>>>
>>>> My company, revl.com, has several videos that could be improved. We've
>>>> played around with ffmpeg filters and haven't had much success. We're
>>>> hoping to find a contractor who can help. This would be a paid contract
>>>> probably lasting about a week.
>>>>
>>>> Specifically we have 4 types of issues:
>>>>
>>>> 1. Sections of video that are too dark due to back-lighting
>>>> 2. Sections of video that are too dark due to general low-light levels
>>>> 3. Bits of video that are shaky
>>>> 4. Videos that generally look OK but could look even better with
>>> different
>>>> saturation or contrast settings.
>>>>
>>>> Ffmpeg provides a lot of filters and each filter can take a variety of
>>>> configuration options. What we're hoping to find is a set of filter
>>>> configurations (e.g. a string passed --filter-complex) that will improve
>>>> our footage. These filters need to be configured to automatically detect
>>>> frames that exhibit the issue; applying a filter at specific manually
>>>> determined time points is not sufficient. It is OK to tell ffmpeg which
>>>> parts of the video frame to use for determining proper light levels
>>>> however.
>>>>
>>>> If you're interested please reply directly to me and we can setup a quick
>>>> video chat to discuss the project in detail.
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> Oliver Dain
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> ffmpeg-user mailing list
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>>>>
>>>> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
>>>> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> ffmpeg-user mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
>>> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
>> _______________________________________________
>> ffmpeg-user mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>>
>> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
>> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
> _______________________________________________
> ffmpeg-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>
> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
>
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Re: Contractor to help with filters

Paul B Mahol
On 12/31/19, Mark Filipak <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Is your application real-time?
>
> On 12/30/2019 10:32 PM, Mick Finn wrote:
>> You need some rule based / AI processing to determine ‘bad lighting
>> sections’ - if you achieve would be viable commercial product.
>> Does ffmpeg have histogram and histogram equalization features?
>> Blindly doing histogram equalization on entire sequence might actually
>> work depending on content.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Dec 31, 2019, at 6:58 AM, Oliver Dain <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi Michael,
>>>
>>> Thanks for the suggestion. I'm not sure what your suggesting would work
>>> for
>>> us. Lets say we have a video that's 5 minutes long and there's a 5 second
>>> segment somewhere in the middle that needs its levels adjusted. If we
>>> used
>>> your solution we'd adjust the entire video so the 5 seconds that was bad
>>> would now look good but the rest of the video would look worse. We're
>>> producing hundreds and hundreds of videos per day and the segments that
>>> need adjusting are different for each video so manually finding the time
>>> offsets where curves should be applied isn't possible (to say nothing of
>>> finding the appropriate curve for each video).
>>>
>>> What we need is a solution that analyzes the video to detect when frames
>>> are dark and then lightens only those frames. What I think we need is
>>> something like the "pp=autolevels" filter but I haven't had much luck
>>> with
>>> that.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Oliver
>>>
>>> On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 3:24 PM Michael Shaffer <[hidden email]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Issues 1 and 2 would be pretty simple to fix. I would use Adobe
>>>> Photoshop
>>>> create a "curves" layer which can then be exported as a .crv file. The
>>>> .crv
>>>> file can be loaded by ffmpeg and applied to the image. Adobe Photoshop
>>>> has
>>>> an auto-adjust button which gets it close, then you can tweak the
>>>> individual RGB values. That is how I eliminate atmospheric haze in real
>>>> time on my live cam. Here's a view of how it looks:
>>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ixjB6dKsgk
>>>>
>>>> I'm not sure about how you would auto detect changes in the
>>>> brightness/contrast. I know OpenCV can do that by calculating a
>>>> histogram
>>>> of the entire image. I'm not sure if ffmpeg can do that or not since
>>>> I've
>>>> never needed to do that.
>>>>
>>>> Michael
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 4:52 PM Oliver Dain <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Hi ffmpeg-users,
>>>>>
>>>>> My company, revl.com, has several videos that could be improved. We've
>>>>> played around with ffmpeg filters and haven't had much success. We're
>>>>> hoping to find a contractor who can help. This would be a paid contract
>>>>> probably lasting about a week.
>>>>>
>>>>> Specifically we have 4 types of issues:
>>>>>
>>>>> 1. Sections of video that are too dark due to back-lighting
>>>>> 2. Sections of video that are too dark due to general low-light levels
>>>>> 3. Bits of video that are shaky
>>>>> 4. Videos that generally look OK but could look even better with
>>>> different
>>>>> saturation or contrast settings.
>>>>>
>>>>> Ffmpeg provides a lot of filters and each filter can take a variety of
>>>>> configuration options. What we're hoping to find is a set of filter
>>>>> configurations (e.g. a string passed --filter-complex) that will
>>>>> improve
>>>>> our footage. These filters need to be configured to automatically
>>>>> detect
>>>>> frames that exhibit the issue; applying a filter at specific manually
>>>>> determined time points is not sufficient. It is OK to tell ffmpeg which
>>>>> parts of the video frame to use for determining proper light levels
>>>>> however.
>>>>>
>>>>> If you're interested please reply directly to me and we can setup a
>>>>> quick
>>>>> video chat to discuss the project in detail.
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>> Oliver Dain
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> ffmpeg-user mailing list
>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>>>>>
>>>>> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
>>>>> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> ffmpeg-user mailing list
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>>>>
>>>> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
>>>> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> ffmpeg-user mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
>>> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
>> _______________________________________________
>> ffmpeg-user mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>>
>> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
>> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".
>>
> _______________________________________________
> ffmpeg-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://ffmpeg.org/mailman/listinfo/ffmpeg-user
>
> To unsubscribe, visit link above, or email
> [hidden email] with subject "unsubscribe".


There is normalize filter for RGB, and histeq filter for YUV.
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